Nobel And Noble Mugs In Glossy Mags

Some time ago, I “exposed myself” to the internet presence of one semi-respectable magazine. Under the banner PEOPLE there were names of featured “personalities” and the tally of comments, relating to each.  Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson got over two thousand comments each, while Jesus (yes, Mr. Christ) got 19. Among featured “others” — politicians, sports stars, money embezzlers, artists, killers etc. –- no one was nowhere near as high as the first two, still leaving the Son of God in the dust.

Granted, it was a peak of high drama: with morbid fascination our nation and the entire universe was following the development of the two actors’ break up… Oh, the perils of young love! Betrayal! Shattering of broken hearts!  Well, you know the story. You must. Even if you swear that you don’t. The capacity of our brains to absorb the information is limitless. Or, rather, inability of our brains to tune out the information is — like, wow! – totally unimpressive. (This out of character turn of phrase should appeal to the younger outcrop of readers, who wasn’t careful and got here by mistake.)

But I digressed right off the bat. All I hope to accomplish here is to re-post some pictures I found in the Russian edition of Esquire magazine, of all places.

Bear with me for a moment. As it appears, the Russian Esquire is a bit different in spirit than its venerable “father”, a men’s magazine, published in the U.S. by the Hearst Corporation, with its enticing motto: Esquire – Beautiful Women, Men’s Fashion, Best Music, Drink Recipes.

The Russian Esquire lists its main topics as being fashion and style, culture and arts, business and politics, personalities and interviews. And it “acts” accordingly, featuring a somewhat more “intellectually loaded” material.

In a way, while the U.S. Esquire is no more than a super-fat-and-glossy tabloid, the Russian one is still trying to infuse a touch of sophistication into Russian gentlemen everywhere. Without making anything resembling an actual difference, though, and still in every sense just an elegantly packaged pablum of entertainment.

Pablum is a processed cereal for infants originally marketed by the Mead Johnson Company in 1931. The trademarked name is a contracted form of the Latin word pabulum, which means “foodstuff.”

In a word, the magazine provides  readers with a kind of pseudo-elitist experience, giving them a minute feeling that they are about to change the world… without the discomfort of getting off of their ergonomic chairs.

Now the images. It’s not beautifully photo-shopped  ladies in dishabille, men’s fashion or pictures of designer cocktails.  It’s — don’t you say! — several Nobel Prize laureates. The scientists agreed to explain their stellar achievements, sketching diagrams on large sheets of drawing paper…

Whatever for scientist is awarded the Nobel Prize? Can really great scientists make really great pictures?

Tip of a hat to the Russian edition of Esquire Magazine and the photographer Volker Steger.

Paul Crutzen,  Dutch Nobel prize winning atmospheric chemist

Paul Crutzen, Dutch Nobel prize (1995) winning atmospheric chemist. A meteorologist from Amsterdam, Director of the Max Planck Institute of Chemistry in Mainz, together with two colleagues, he proved that air pollution weakens the Earth’s ozone layer, which prevents the penetration of ultraviolet radiation on the planet, thus making it suitable for life.  

jack Steinberger  for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino

Jack Steinberger, German physicist, Nobel Prize in Physics in 1988, co-discovered the muon neutrino, along with Leon Lederman and Melvin Schwartz, for which they shared Nobel Prize.

Peter Andreas Grünberg   German physicist  Nobel Prize in Physics laureate for his discovery with Albert Fert of giant magnetoresistance which brought about a breakthrough in gigabyte hard disk drives.

Peter Andreas Grünberg, German physicist, Nobel Prize in Physics (2007) laureate for his discovery with Albert Fert of giant magnetoresistance which brought about a breakthrough in development of gigabyte hard disk drives.

Aaron Ciechanover   an Israeli biologist, who won the Nobel prize in Chemistry for characterizing the method that cells use to degrade and

Aaron Ciechanover, an Israeli biologist, who won the Nobel prize in Chemistry (2004) for characterizing the method that cells use to degrade and recycle proteins using ubiquitin.

Robert Kerl, Professor of chemistry at Rice University in Houston, Texas, Nobel Prize laureate in Chemistry.(1996).His work led to the creation of entirely new materials for nanotechnology and made possible the further miniaturization of as computer components.

Robert Kerl, Professor of chemistry at Rice University in Houston, Texas, Nobel Prize laureate in Chemistry.(1996).His work led to the creation of entirely new materials for nanotechnology and made possible the further miniaturization of computer components.

Tim Huntwas awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Paul Nurse and Leland H. Hartwell for their discoveries of protein molecules that control the division (duplication) of cells.

Tim Hunt was awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Paul Nurse and Leland H. Hartwell for their discoveries of protein molecules that control the division (duplication) of cells.

Richard Royce Schrock   an American chemist and Nobel laureate recognized for his contributions to the olefin metathesis reaction used in organic chemistry

Richard Royce Schrock, an American chemist and Nobel laureate (2005), MIT, is recognized for his contributions to the olefin metathesis reaction used in organic chemistry

Kurt Wüthrich  is a Swiss chemist and biophysicist and Nobel Chemistry laureate, known for developing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR methods for studying biological macromolecules

Kurt Wüthrich is a Swiss chemist and biophysicist and Nobel Chemistry laureate 2002), known for developing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR methods for studying biological macromolecules.

Craig Cameron Mello (born October 18, 1960) is an American biologist and professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Massachusetts. He was awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, along with Andrew Z. Fire, for the discovery of RNA interference.

Craig Cameron Mello  is an American biologist and professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Massachusetts. He was awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, along with Andrew Z. Fire, for the discovery of RNA interference.

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