Neosurrealism Of George Grie

Grie1

George Grie (Yuri Gribanovsky, Юрий Грибановский), born May 14, 1962, is a Russian-Canadian artist. Educated as “classical” painter, he became a professional multimedia graphic design artist and joined the IBM Corporation as a lead new-media specialist.

Attack of Nostalgia. 1991, Oil x Canvas, 102x78 centimeters, St. Petersburg, signed as Y. Gribanovsky Artist’s possession 2011

Attack of Nostalgia.
1991, Oil x Canvas, 102×78 centimeters, St. Petersburg, signed as Y. Gribanovsky
Artist’s possession 2011

Computers don’t make art, people do. Computers are merely creative tools – very sophisticated ones. Once you try them, you will never give up moving forward. There might be just one tiny annoying obstacle between you and your perfect design – lack of imagination. —George Grie

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Mr Grie is rather vocal about his art and his worldview. His comments aren’t without merit. Here what he says and says what he does about “sifting through the morass of mass culture”:

In recent decades […] some historians and intellectuals have questioned whether a sharp distinction between mass and popular culture can be maintained. Both social historians and critical theorists have challenged presumed processes of social homogenization and ideological domination associated with mass culture. I also question the usefulness of maintaining a strict distinction between mass culture and popular culture, particularly in twentieth-century Western Europe and North America, where the popularity of mass culture vastly overreaches the influence of folk cultures.

Ghost ship series: Full moon rising It is hardly possible to deny a significant effect that our closest body in space has on the Earth.

Ghost ship series: Full moon rising It is hardly possible to deny a significant effect that our closest body in space has on the Earth. — George Grie

Instead, I employ the surrealists to help me sift through the morass of mass culture to recover a “secret history” of popular culture in early twentieth-century France. That is, the surrealists guide me, as a cultural historian, to specific expressions of mass culture whose cultural meanings remain partially detached from the ideological interests or social values of their commercial production.

The three graces, Goth mode style Modern art culture and subculture influence heavily our perception of female beauty. If you check the art history, you would notice how dramatic this change could be.

The three graces, Goth mode style
Modern art culture and subculture influence heavily our perception of female beauty. If you check the art history, you would notice how dramatic this change could be.  — George Grie

See more of George Grie and his sophisticated opinions here: George Grie’s Romantic Neo-surrealism Art Gallery.

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