Michelangelo of Microsoft Excel

www.spoon-tamago.comFor over 15 years, Japanese artist Tatsuo Horiuchi has rendered the subtle details of mountains, cherry blossoms, and dense forests with the most unlikely tool: Microsoft Excel. The 77-year-old illustrator shunned the idea of paying for expensive painting supplies or even a basic drawing program for his computer, saying that he prefers Excel even over Microsoft Paint because it has “more functions and is easier to use.” www.spoon-tamago.com

www.spoon-tamago.comUsing simple vector drawing tools developed primarily for graphs and simple shapes, Horiuchi instead draws panoramic scenes of life in rural Japan.

 

Advertisements

Meet The Artist: Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Ceslovas Cesnakevicius is 30 year old artist from Lithuania. He creates really unusual digital artwork.  His photos are so simple and at the same time so incredibly thought-provoking.

The artist has been careful for a decade to take shoots with the intention to create little surreal worlds. Each one of them, ethereal and fragile, with a story behind.

Cesnakevicius explains that his works are small pieces of his biography. Images which refer to artists like Magritte. Clean digital manipulations, which can be mistaken with oils.

See more of this artist’s works here.

 

Meet The Artist: Sergey Kolesov

red-doorDigital art. Concept art. That’s about Sergey Kolesov.  He was born, brought up and educated in Ivanovo, Russian Federation.

I love drawing since childhood. I drew on desks, in notebooks and in textbooks. I drew comics, ninjas and Schwarzenegger.

Digital art world is global “by design.” Sergey worked for Half Life 2 and then spent two years living and working at Arkane Studios in Brno, Czech Republic.

Nowadays Mr. Kolesov hails from Lyon, France, where he is employed as staff concept artist by Arkane Studios.

See more of Sergey’s works here. He also shows his technique in a series of “sped up”videos on Vimeo. Although digital artwork does not involve waiting for oil paints to dry,  the “road” from one pixel to a complete product is a very, very tedious process. It takes tons of time and patience. And talent, of course, in addition to the expertise in using digital tools. And imagination. Lots of it. Have I mentioned talent?