Meet The Artist: Gregory Scott

Gregory Scott, designer, artist, photographer.

Disconnect

Most of my life I worked as a graphic designer and creative director. I owned a design firm in Chicago and it was a great ride. But eventually I began to want something different. I began to play around with art in my free time, painting and shooting photographs.

Bound

[…] The idea I had tested was to take some paintings I made during a figure painting class and fill in missing parts of the painted figure with myself. I thought it was fun and different, but didn’t really have any plans for what to do next, if anything at all.

Thank You Jeff Koons and Art Rogers

Framed

Homage

Storybook

 

“all by himself with leaves, trees, mud and rabbits”

Christ in the Wilderness. Driven by the Spirit. And immediately the Spirit driveth him into the wilderness.” Mark 1:12

Stanley Spencer (1891 – 1959), a great English artist, joined in his work expressionism and primitivism, mysticism and grotesque. The cycle of his paintings “Christ in the Wilderness” (1939-54) literally overturns traditional notion about Christ and his relationship with the Earth.
IN middle age, eccentric British painter Stanley Spencer changed his obsession from religion to sex — with disastrous consequences. He divorced his homely first wife Hilda Carline and shacked up (or tried to) with glamorous lesbian Patricia Preece, who turned out to be mainly interested in his money. The potboilers he painted in the 1930s were done to keep Preece in furs and jewels; and he made the mistake of signing over his house to her. Not long after their wedding, Preece let out the house, making Spencer homeless.The director of the Tate Gallery found ­Spencer lodgings near Swiss Cottage Tube station in north London. It was in this bedsit that the artist embarked on a series of paintings called Christ in the Wilderness, which included this panel, Consider the Lilies.

“Consider the lilies how they grow,” runs the line in the Gospels to which the title refers. “They toil not, they spin not, and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not ­arrayed like one of these.” Like most of Spencer’s works, however, the biblical scene has been transposed to the Berkshire village of Cookham where he grew up, and which he considered a sort of paradise on earth — these are not lilies but daisies and wild grass flowers of the sort that grew on Cookham common in his youth. (from Stanley Spencer confronts the self, alone in Christ in the Wilderness.)

Many dismissed the artist as an eccentric crank. He identified himself with religious figures, dwelling in contemporary village. Still, it’s exactly this very eccentricity that Spencer’s works so powerful, art lovers and art critics alike agree.Christ In The Wilderness: the hen. This painting illustrates Matthew 23:37 ‘…how often would I have gathered my children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings…’ 

Where else in the Bible does man appear in such union with the beasts, with no fear and alienation? Obviously, in Eden, where Adam resided before the fall. Christ, who came to save mankind from the curse of original sin, is the new Adam, as described in the Epistles of the Apostle Paul. Therefore, the desert where Spencer’s Jesus find himself, is not only the place of fasting and prayer, but also the image of the restored paradise, where man is reunited with God and the universe created by him. The desert is the tiny remnant of Eden, which once extended to the whole Earth, and at the same time the foretaste of a new Earth, where humanity will enter through the saving sacrifice of Christ.

Therefore, Jesus peacefully dwells among animals, birds, plants and with childish curiosity he peers at them, for this firstborn Son of God has found his human nature, similarity with earthly being. As a creature “from another planet”, Jesus gets used to this world, delicately delves into it, amused and delighted. (My free interpretation of the excerpt from the Russian article by M. Epstein, an Anglo-American and Russian literary theorist and critical thinker, S. C. Dobbs Professor of Cultural Theory and Russian Literature at Emory University.) 

Christ in the Wilderness. The Scorpion. “Behold, I give unto you the power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.” Luke 10:19.

There were meant to be 40 panels in the series, one for each day Christ spent in the wilderness. They should have covered the vault of the ceiling of a church, so that the Jesus’ whitish robes would take on the appearance of clouds in a mackerel sky.

Spencer finished only eight panels of the series. Historian Simon Schama described them as “the least elaborate and most affecting things he had ever done”. In 1983, all eight (plus one half-finished canvas) were bought by the Art Gallery of Western Australia for $600,000, the museum’s entire annual budget. It was a wise decision.  Christ in the Wilderness paintings are popular with gallery visitors and much in demand for loans.

Hyperrealistic Picasso

Eugenio Merino, a Spanish sculptor from Picasso's birthplace of Malaga, has created the life-like statue of the artist for a new exhibition highlighting the problems of tourism for locals. Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 he died in France in 1973 having helped create one of the 20th century's most important artistic movements in CubismEugenio Merino, a Spanish sculptor from Picasso’s birthplace of Malaga, has created the life-like statue of Pablo Picasso for a new exhibition highlighting the problems of tourism for locals. Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 he died in France in 1973 having helped create one of the 20th century’s most important artistic movements in Cubism.The work is displayed inside a gift shop and viewers are allowed to take selfies with it, which Merino says will demonstrate how a complex artist and his work has been reduced to souvenir status. Picasso initially started out painting relatively life- like portraits influenced by impressionism, but soon incorporated surreal elements and motifs from African art, creating CubismThe work is displayed inside a gift shop and viewers are allowed to take selfies with it, which Merino says will demonstrate how a complex artist and his work has been reduced to souvenir status. Picasso initially started out painting relatively life- like portraits influenced by impressionism, but soon incorporated surreal elements and motifs from African art, creating Cubism.Merino is allowing tourists to take pictures with the statue, including with selfie sticks which have been banned from most museums, in a move which he hopes will help to prove his point. During his early years in Paris, Picasso was so poor that much of his early work was burned into order to heat his apartment. Today he holds the record for most expensive artwork ever sold, at $117millionThe work is constructed from fiberglass, resin and plastic and has been coated with silicone and embedded with real human hair. Merino matched the model to the artist’s real height, 5’3″ and based it on photographs of him. The artist was well-known in his later years for wearing a striped top, cloth trousers and rope-soled shoes, which he is dressed in for the show.

Merino is allowing tourists to take pictures with the statue, including with selfie sticks which have been banned from most museums, in a move which he hopes will help to prove his point. During his early years in Paris, Picasso was so poor that much of his early work was burned into order to heat his apartment. Today he holds the record for most expensive artwork ever sold, at $117million.Merino said tourism is often harmful to local communities, pushing people out of their homes as prices rise and drawing in huge crowds of people who put a strain on resources. While Picasso often takes all of the credit for having developed Cubism, in fact he created the artistic movement alongside collaborator Georges BraqueMerino said tourism is often harmful to local communities, pushing people out of their homes as prices rise and drawing in huge crowds of people who put a strain on resources. While Picasso often takes all of the credit for having developed Cubism, in fact he created the artistic movement alongside collaborator Georges Braque.Merino (pictured rear) is known for creating sculptures of dead people from history. He has previously made a mode of dictator Franco inside a Coca-Cola fridge, and of Osama bin Laden at a rave. Picasso set the mold for modern artists, and is often cited as the first painter to have achieved real fame while still aliveMerino (pictured rear) is known for creating sculptures of dead people from history. He has previously made a mode of dictator Franco inside a Coca-Cola fridge, and of Osama bin Laden at a rave. Picasso set the mold for modern artists, and is often cited as the first painter to have achieved real fame while still alive.

The “real” Pablo Picasso:Picasso was born in Malaga but left for France as a young boy and never returned. He died in France in 1973. As a nod to this, Merino has written the plaque for his sculpture in French, which reads: 'Here lies our beloved Pablo Picasso, 1881-1973, we miss you.' Picasso did return to Spain several times in his life and drew on it for inspiration with his painting

The related Daily Mail article is here: That’s a good impression(ism): Hyperrealistic sculpture of Picasso complete with HUMAN HAIR goes on display in his birthplace of Malaga.

Giorgio de Chirico

https://www.tretyakovgallery.ru/dataphotos/0/0d/0d2841637df730ad609a3c58e5ada4a0.jpg

The founder of the Metaphysical art movement, Giorgio de Chirico (1888-1978) was an Italian (Born in Volos,Greece)surrealist painter, whose work implied a metaphysical questioning of reality. He studied in Athens and Florence, then moved to Germany to continue his studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. There he was influenced by the writings of Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer.https://i2.wp.com/os.colta.ru/m/photo/2009/02/11/giorgio_de_chirico-500.jpgOn his way to Paris, De Chirico traveled back to Florence and later to Turin, where he was moved by the metaphysical beauty of the surroundings. Why suddenly de Chirico?

https://i0.wp.com/smallbay.ru/images/chirico1.jpgPaintings of all major periods of de Chirico’s creative life will be exhibited: both metaphysical and post-metaphysical painting, as well as early canvases. Russian art lovers, Muscovites particularly, suddenly became newly excited about de Chirico, and art bloggers reacted accordingly.

https://i1.wp.com/os.colta.ru/m/photo/2008/11/19/1arrr_big_1.jpgIn the opinion of one blogger, the artist anticipated the further development of historical events in his paintings, as often the case with true visionaries. Her favorites are de Chirico’s landscapes, and her views, however controversial, seemed to me interesting enough to share, loosely translated from Russian.

His [De Chirico’s] landscape is the Imperial Rome with its greatness, power, brutality and… boredom — an ideal depiction of totalitarianism.
After all, she notes, up to the middle of the 20th century, Italy dreamt about the revival of Roman imperial greatness. Nazi dictator Mussolini was the product of this dream. However, nothing of consequence happened:  Italians got a few hefty slaps in the face and, for a time being, forgot their ambitious plans of revival of the Roman Empire.
https://i2.wp.com/tannarh.narod.ru/pics/kir/kir_24.jpgToday’s typical Italian is an elderly person who enjoys comfort, preserves his health and tranquillity. He isn’t in a hurry to exchange his convenience and the opportunity to live   past 80 on such illusory benefit as greatness of his country.

Giorgio de Chirico

Giorgio de Chirico. Self-portrait.

Today’s Russian abandoned his dreams of Cosmos and communism. He wants to become what the Italian has become already.  His prevalent idea of spending the rest  of his life is simple and unburdened by existential questions. It all boils down to growing old,  slowly — oh, so slowly — enjoying his own garden somewhere in the warm climes.  Not everybody can afford such luxury these days, however.  Who will provide such luxury for him? This is yet another existential question, to which there is no answer in de Chirico’s ladscapes.

Water!

Humans continually violate the harmony of nature and, as a result, suffer from lack of natural resources. This constant and resonant plot is embodied in numerous works of art. Mustafah Abdulaziz, American photographer based in Berlin, is undertaking a 15 year long project (2011 to 2026) appropriately named Water. He traveled the world looking for water, researching how different cultures perceive water, its exploitation, and the challenges to preserve our planet’s most vital resource. Today, his body of work covers eight countries on four continents, and is supported by Water Aid, Earth Watch, WWF, VSCO, and the UN.

The image below capture a group of fishermen waiting for their turn to sea. The locale is Sindh Province, Pakistan, 2013.Abdulaziz’s striking images look at the fragility of life but, more importantly, they hold up a mirror to how our individual behavior affects the collective’s quality of life.

The 2 images below is from Sierra Leone. The availability of drinking water in this country is limited. Studies of recent years show that the need for drinking water in urban population of Sierra Leone is satisfied only by some 84%, and rural by only 32%.

India. The population of India is 3.5 times greater than that of US, creating a huge burden on agriculture and natural resources. About 21% of infectious diseases in the country is due to the quality of drinking water, which is significantly lower than any allowable level.Pakistan. Scientists from the UN University believe that the first nuclear conflict on Earth might break out not between Russia and the United States but between Pakistan and India due to lack of drinking water.

Nigeria. The most densely populated country of the African continent risks to enter the top three most populous countries of the world by 2050. Today, more than 60 million Nigerians live without access to drinking water, and more than 100 million lack access to purified water.

Interview with the photographer and more images in Photographer Mustafah Abdulaziz Traveled the World Looking for Waterre.

 

The Art Of Passover

The eight-day festival of Passover is celebrated in the early spring, from the 15th through the 22nd of the Hebrew month of Nissan, April 10–18, 2017 (Hebrew year 5777).
Happy Passover to those who celebrate. !חג פסח שמח
For Jews around the world, the Pesach Seder is an excellent occasion to gather at a large table, eat, drink and recall the exodus from Egypt.

For the great painters of the Renaissance, the ritual served as an inexhaustible source of inspiration.

Here is how Leonardo da Vinci painted the Seder of 13 Nisan 3793 on the wall of the refectory of the Dominican convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan. The painting dates from 1495-1498:
Below is the engraving of Albrecht Dürer, created in 1523, from collection of the New York Metropolitan Museum. St John is easily recognized here not only by the absence of a beard, but also by his place at the festive table. It is unclear, though, where the Jesus’s favorite pupil hid his legs. Judas is conspicuously absent, perhaps not to spoil the festive mood.Still below, is the amusing painting of Paolo Veronese “The Feast in the House of Levi”. Originally it was also called “The Last Supper”, but it had to be renamed after the intervention of the Inquisition, accusing the artist of an unfaithful depiction of the event. Veronese’s Last Supper is different from the canonical description by the evangelists. The Seder begins after the stars come out, however Veronese’s Seder feast takes place in the light of the day. The main objection, though, was the “composition” of the participants  — too many people that shouldn’t have been in the presence of Jesus at His Last Supper. The problem went away when the feast has been moved to the “house of Levi”. The canvas of epic proportions (one and a half times larger than Leonardo’s fresco) occupies the entire wall of the Venetian Academy:
The famous canvas of Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti), created in Venice almost 100 years after the masterpiece of Leonardo. The painting is exhibited in the Basilica of San Giorgio Maggiore on the island of the same name. In the best baroque traditions, it depicts Jesus and his disciples at the festive table in the 16th century Venetian trattoria. Curiously, the mighty Inquisition had no problem with Tintoretto who placed a number of extraneous persons onto the canvas. Perhaps, it was because the supper takes place with the stars out?
“The Last Supper” by the Russian artist Nikolai Ge below was presented to the public in the fall of 1863 in the Academy of Arts of St. Petersburg. Church censorship tried to ban it and demanded its removal from the exhibition. The day was saved by Tsar Alexander II intervention. The royal mecenat bought the painting from the artist. Grudgingly, the clerics had to forget about their claims for a while (although the synodal ban on the publication of reproductions in Russia persisted until the February Revolution of 1917).It should be noted that of the five masterpieces above, only Nikolai Ge’s correctly reflected the ritual of the Last Supper: Passover, the exodus of Jews from Egyptian bondage should be celebrated reclining (מסובין) rather than sitting on the chairs around the table. Accordingly, Jesus’s beloved disciple shouldn’t be depicted sitting on the Teacher’s lap as portrayed by Durer, but rather reclined beside Him.

Many other great masters painted the Last Supper, among them Daniele Crespi, Hans Holbein (Hans the Younger), Juan de Juanes, Ugolino da Siena, Duccio di Buoninsegna

The Feather Book of Dionisio Minaggio

The Feather Book of Dionisio Minaggio, also referred to in Italian as Il bestiario barocco (The Baroque Bestiary), is a collection of 156 pictures made almost entirely from bird feathers augmented with pieces of bird skin, feet, and beaks. They were created between 1616 and 1618 by Dionisio Minaggio, the chief gardener of the Duchy of Milan and were originally bound into a book. The majority of pictures in the book are of birds indigenous to the Lombardy region of Italy at the time, but it also contained sets of other images depicting hunters, tradesmen, musicians, and commedia dell’arte characters. (Wikipedia)There are amusing scenes of everyday life: a patient suffering in the hands of a dentist, a man playing a melody on a pipe, and waiting for his dog to “do her things” — musicians, artisans and actors, birds and plants.
At that time, Milan was ruled by Spain, and the Spaniards were familiar with the art of the pen widely practiced in Central and South America. Although the style and methods were very different, it is possible that knowledge about this art form served as inspiration. Still, this is only an educated guess.To this day, we do not have the faintest idea why Dionisio Minaggio created such an unusual for the time book, and who, if anyone, commissioned it.

Meet The Artist: Pedro Roldán Molina

molina 1.jpg
molina 98molina 2An unusual technique, sunny colors, a fantastic country…

Molina_hudozhnikPedro Roldán Molina is an internationally recognized and well-known Spanish artist. He was born in the province of Cordoba in Rute, Spain, in 1954. He studied art in Barcelona. His work can be seen in major museums around the world.

Currently, Pedro Roldán Molina lives and works in Granada, Spain.

molina 7 molina 4An aura of a perfect dream…molina 8What you see and hear, to some extent, depends on what you are. I believe that each canvas, still life, landscape, in essence, is a self-portrait of the soul. (From a blog featuring  works of Pedro Roldán Molina.)molina 95molina 6molina 91molina 93molina 94

Trash As Art

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама Portuguese street artist Artur Bordalo creates monumental three-dimensional sculptures of animals using, well, garbage that people routinely throw out, depositing their refuse not necessarily in or around designated garbage disposal places. Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама  The artist wants to draw public attention to environmental pollution.Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама Arthur creates three-dimensional animals from garbage and old rubbish, which people throw out.Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама Artur’s work can be found not only in Portugal, but also in other countries, in particular in the United States and Estonia. Presumably, he doesn’t transport his native Portuguese garbage but uses local materials easily found no matter wherever he goes.  Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

Скульптуры животных из мусора и хлама

It Hurts!

The Milgram Experiment  of 1961 showed ordinary people were willing to inflict terrible pain on a stranger when ‘following orders’. Stanley Milgram, an American social psychologist, attempted to test social compliance. His inspiration was the trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann. Eichmann’s defense for arranging the mass killing of Jews was that he was only ‘following orders’.

Derren Brown recreated the experiment in his 2006 documentary The Heist. His findings differed not the whole lot from the Milgram original most subjects would, indeed, harm others, following orders given by persons of authority.

Human nature, surely, must’ve changed in fifty years! We’ve become more independent, less subservient, more defiant, freer thinkers, less willing to obey the authority without questioning its motives. More humane! That’s it. Haven’t we become all of the above?  We must have! Well? What?

Yes. Human nature have changed.  If anything, it has got worse. 

This time, 80 participants were recruited, including women as well as men, and 90 per cent were willing to inflict the highest shock level of 450 volts to a complicit “learner” screaming in agony.

Social psychologist Dr Tomasz Grzyb, from the SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Poland, said: “Upon learning about Milgram’s experiments, a vast majority of people claim that ‘I would never behave in such a manner’.

“Our study has, yet again, illustrated the tremendous power of the situation the subjects are confronted with and how easily they can agree to things which they find unpleasant.”

The participants, aged 18 to 69, were shown an electric generator which was demonstrated by administering a mild shock of 45 volts.

Volunteers were given a series of 10 levers to press, each appearing to send a successively higher shock to the learner – out of sight in a neighbouring room – via electrodes attached to the wrist.

In reality, no electric shocks were delivered, and, as in the original experiment, the learner was playing a role.

After pressing lever number two, “successive impulses of electricity ” resulted in screams of increasing pain from the learner,” the scientists wrote in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

“These screams were recorded and played back at appropriate moments.”

The “teachers” were told they were taking part in research on memory and learning.

Just as in Milgram’s experiment, they were spurred on by prompts from the supervising scientist such as “the experiment requires that you continue”, “it is absolutely essential that you continue”, and “you have no other choice, you must go on”.

Mercy was more apparent when the learner was a woman. In this case, the number of participants refusing to carry out the orders of the experimenter was three times higher than when the person receiving the “shocks” was a man.

Dr Grzyb concluded: “Half a century after Milgram’s original research into obedience to authority, a striking majority of subjects are still willing to electrocute a helpless individual.” 

The above is a quote from the article in The Telegraph with a telling title, Nine in 10 people would electrocute others if ordered, rerun of infamous Milgram Experiment shows.

The article also mentions a recent study conducted at St Andrew’s University. The study suggests that people were happy to inflict pain on others if they believed it was for the greater good. The researchers looked back through records of the original experiment and found that those who took part were not unhappy with their choice.

So much for the humanity, human morals and its spirit, healthy and free. Makes you want to scream, “It hurts!”