Hyperrealistic Picasso

Eugenio Merino, a Spanish sculptor from Picasso's birthplace of Malaga, has created the life-like statue of the artist for a new exhibition highlighting the problems of tourism for locals. Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 he died in France in 1973 having helped create one of the 20th century's most important artistic movements in CubismEugenio Merino, a Spanish sculptor from Picasso’s birthplace of Malaga, has created the life-like statue of Pablo Picasso for a new exhibition highlighting the problems of tourism for locals. Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 he died in France in 1973 having helped create one of the 20th century’s most important artistic movements in Cubism.The work is displayed inside a gift shop and viewers are allowed to take selfies with it, which Merino says will demonstrate how a complex artist and his work has been reduced to souvenir status. Picasso initially started out painting relatively life- like portraits influenced by impressionism, but soon incorporated surreal elements and motifs from African art, creating CubismThe work is displayed inside a gift shop and viewers are allowed to take selfies with it, which Merino says will demonstrate how a complex artist and his work has been reduced to souvenir status. Picasso initially started out painting relatively life- like portraits influenced by impressionism, but soon incorporated surreal elements and motifs from African art, creating Cubism.Merino is allowing tourists to take pictures with the statue, including with selfie sticks which have been banned from most museums, in a move which he hopes will help to prove his point. During his early years in Paris, Picasso was so poor that much of his early work was burned into order to heat his apartment. Today he holds the record for most expensive artwork ever sold, at $117millionThe work is constructed from fiberglass, resin and plastic and has been coated with silicone and embedded with real human hair. Merino matched the model to the artist’s real height, 5’3″ and based it on photographs of him. The artist was well-known in his later years for wearing a striped top, cloth trousers and rope-soled shoes, which he is dressed in for the show.

Merino is allowing tourists to take pictures with the statue, including with selfie sticks which have been banned from most museums, in a move which he hopes will help to prove his point. During his early years in Paris, Picasso was so poor that much of his early work was burned into order to heat his apartment. Today he holds the record for most expensive artwork ever sold, at $117million.Merino said tourism is often harmful to local communities, pushing people out of their homes as prices rise and drawing in huge crowds of people who put a strain on resources. While Picasso often takes all of the credit for having developed Cubism, in fact he created the artistic movement alongside collaborator Georges BraqueMerino said tourism is often harmful to local communities, pushing people out of their homes as prices rise and drawing in huge crowds of people who put a strain on resources. While Picasso often takes all of the credit for having developed Cubism, in fact he created the artistic movement alongside collaborator Georges Braque.Merino (pictured rear) is known for creating sculptures of dead people from history. He has previously made a mode of dictator Franco inside a Coca-Cola fridge, and of Osama bin Laden at a rave. Picasso set the mold for modern artists, and is often cited as the first painter to have achieved real fame while still aliveMerino (pictured rear) is known for creating sculptures of dead people from history. He has previously made a mode of dictator Franco inside a Coca-Cola fridge, and of Osama bin Laden at a rave. Picasso set the mold for modern artists, and is often cited as the first painter to have achieved real fame while still alive.

The “real” Pablo Picasso:Picasso was born in Malaga but left for France as a young boy and never returned. He died in France in 1973. As a nod to this, Merino has written the plaque for his sculpture in French, which reads: 'Here lies our beloved Pablo Picasso, 1881-1973, we miss you.' Picasso did return to Spain several times in his life and drew on it for inspiration with his painting

The related Daily Mail article is here: That’s a good impression(ism): Hyperrealistic sculpture of Picasso complete with HUMAN HAIR goes on display in his birthplace of Malaga.

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Mueck At Work

Ron Mueck98

London-based sculptor Ron Mueck, formerly a model maker and puppeteer for children’s television and films, has been creating fine art sculptures since 1996. Using resin, fiberglass, silicone, and many other materials, Mueck constructs hyperrealistic likenesses of human beings, while playing with scale. The detailed sculptures are captivating when viewed up close, as they may be many times larger or smaller than expected. (Atlantic.)

I’m fascinated by Ron Mueck’s  artwork — see my Hyperventilating Over Hyperrealism post from 2 years ago.

Ever the best photographs of Ron Mueck at work in his liar of creativity were created by Gautier Deblonde.  French by birth and upbringing, Gautier Deblonde works in London as a photographer since 1991.

He photographed the active process for Ron Mueck’s sculpture Boy for the Millennium Dome in London. Published by the Anthony d’Offay Gallery, this series of photographs won a World Press Award in 2001.Boy

Here is more of Ron Mueck by Gautier Deblonde.

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Hyperventilating Over Hyperrealism

The other day, I read a brief article in The Huffington Post about the art of Ron Mueck, an Australian sculptor currently working in London,  Nude Sculptures By Ron Mueck Bring Hyperrealism To A Whole Other Level.

Ron Mueck

Ron Mueck

I was fortunate to see the exhibit of his sculptures at the National Galleries of Scotland in Edinburgh in 2006. Truth be told, I was not prepared for the visual assault that lay in wait for me.

Periodically, I had to remind myself to adjust my face into a semblance of an expression that, hopefully, could be taken (or mistaken) for a semi-intelligent face of a person viewing an art exhibition rather than that of a dumbfounded person hit over the head with unanticipated suddenness.

In Bed 2005

In Bed 2005

Slowly moving along the sculpture of the woman “In Bed”, I remember feeling an unequivocally weird desire to knock at the white expanse of the sheet just to hear the hollow sound of empty space under it… only to convince myself that there are no bent knees under it.

Ron-Mueck-Wild-Man

Wild Man (2005)

The Wild Man (2005) is naked, hairy and very large. The giant, he is imposing by size only. His face is frightened and his pose is that of a man cringing in terror. The sculptor  shocks us into reassessing ourselves in our existential nakedness.

When asked, “How and when did you get the idea of manipulating scale with your figures?” Ron Mueck answered, “I never made life-size figures because it never seemed to be interesting. We meet life-size people every day.”

The Edinburgh’s exhibit that I visited was the first showing of A Girl (2006).

A Girl (2006)

A Girl (2006)

Speak of engaging the viewer’s rapt attention! Hands and arms held down beside her body, her head stretched out towards the viewer, the baby seems to be testing out the space she occupies in the world. In fact, the pose is quite unnatural for the infant — normally a baby would hold its hands towards its face, but Mueck wants to suggest the assertiveness of the new life force, says the booklet I’ve got at the exhibition. Whether the artist wanted to suggest exactly this or something entirely different is up to the author of this passage  (Keith Hartley) to know and up to us — to take his word for it.

Ron-Mueck-Big-Man

Untitled (Big Man), 2000.

Views of the work in progress and detail of the Big Man.

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Hyperrealism has its roots in the philosophy of Jean Baudrillard, “the simulation of something which never really existed.” As such, Hyperrealists create a false reality, a convincing illusion based on a simulation of reality, the definition says. How fully this definition applies to the art of Ron Mueck (and other artists called hyperrelists) is the matter of opinion and, again, the matter of definition.

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The works of other hyperrealists, such as Evan Penny, Jamie Salmon, Duane Hanson and others I’ve found on this site.