Meet The Artist: Ceslovas Cesnakevicius

Ceslovas Cesnakevicius is 30 year old artist from Lithuania. He creates really unusual digital artwork.  His photos are so simple and at the same time so incredibly thought-provoking.

The artist has been careful for a decade to take shoots with the intention to create little surreal worlds. Each one of them, ethereal and fragile, with a story behind.

Cesnakevicius explains that his works are small pieces of his biography. Images which refer to artists like Magritte. Clean digital manipulations, which can be mistaken with oils.

See more of this artist’s works here.

 

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Meet The Artist: Joel Rea

Joel Rea, 32-year-old artist from Australia, works in an unusual genre, combining photorealism with surrealism.
He paints portraits and landscapes, animals and the ocean and it seems that there is no such theme on the basis of which he could not create his picture.Joel prefers to work with canvas and oil, perfecting every smallest detail.

“It is very easy to smile when you win, but for me the most interesting thing is exactly what people do in the darkest hours of their lives, because it is at such moments that you show up as a person,” says the artist.

Мееt The Sculptor: Isabel Miramontes

Born in Spain and influenced by the Celtic Origins of her village, the bronze works of Isabel MIRAMONTES have both a primitive and essential quality to them.

Her recognizable androgynous figures express a narrative of quiet certitude and the inevitable struggle of everyday man, his obstacles and triumphs.

The figures bear the weight of humanity, astonishingly defying their bronze origins with a definite fluidity of movement and a spiritual density omnipresent in her work.

Highly schooled and celebrated artist, Isabel MIRAMONTES resides in Belgium where she was raised and attended the Institute Sainte Marie and Saint Gilles.

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Allez Viens

Isabel is known for her bronze works, and does both commissioned monumental works, as well as small to midsize more accessible works as found on display at the Canfin Gallery. 

(Most of the narrative for this post and some of the images came from the Canfin Gallery’s site.)

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Extase

Isabel’s works reside in both public and private collections.

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Glissade

The artist’s work is pure movement, even if it’s an “animated” chair or bench. Unusual forms, elongated spirals and horizontal strips, which seem to wrap around the figure, show an inner confusion. Every figure is amazingly plastic and poetic.

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Chemin de Vie

“Isabel Miramontes feels that art calms the torments of life, and she freely
miramontes
reinvents them using her own artistic language. Her line is that of the wind, timelessly expanding and contracting to form her unique sculptural style. She does not like superfluous expression. To Miramontes, man and medium intermingle, becoming emotions and forgotten sensations which create art in its purest sense.”

 

 

Smoldering Stone: Gian Lorenzo Bernini

Скульптура_Джан-Лоренцо-Бернини_Blessed-Ludovica-Albertoni-1671–74_02.jpgContinued from previous post.

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Self-portrait of Bernini, 1623

Passion is like a tornado, its frenzied whirlwind is felt in Bernini’s every sculpture. Bernini’s marble breezes passion, feeling known to him only so well.

He had a mistress, you see. She was a beautiful married woman named Constance. Some well-wisher told Bernini that Constance was cheating on him with his brother Luigi, no less. Furious, overcome with jealousy, Bernini informed everyone that he was leaving town for a few days. By the day’s end he showed up at Constance’s house. The rumor, unfortunately, turned out to be true.

Betrayed, enraged, Bernini would have killed his own brother, but the guards arrived and prevented murder about to occur. Then he sent his servant to exact an awful punishment on his cheating lover. The servant cut Constance’s face with a knife, ruining the woman’s beauty forever.

The year was of Our Lord 1640. By his late teens, Bernini had already established himself

Gian Lorenzo Bernini in 1665, painted by Giovanni Battista Gaulli.

as a prodigious artist. He received his first major commissions from rapacious art lover Cardinal Scipione Borghese. The early works executed for the Cardinal won Bernini such acclaim that praise and accolades began to pour in. In 1621, Bernini was knighted, and in 1629, he was named the Official Architect of Saint Peters, one of the highest honors an artist could wish for. The artist frequented papal and royal circles, and was fervently admired even outside of Italy.

Thus punishment for all his crimes was far from harsh — Bernini had to pay a modest fine. And then the pontiff, who considered the sculptor to be his friend, sentenced him to… marriage to the most beautiful girl in Rome.

However, the dark streak wasn’t over. In 1646, the bell tower Bernini created for the façade of St. Peter’s had to be demolished after it developed worrisome cracks, and the shame of this failure proved almost too much for the artist to bear: contemporary sources say Bernini took to his bed and fasted almost to the point of death.

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Ecstasy of Saint Teresa. 1647-52

Then Bernini created The Ecstasy of Saint Theresa, and immediately revived his career. It was a success that started a new era in Bernini’s artistic life and popularity that lasted until his death in 1680.

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Blessed Ludovica Albertoni. 1671-73

Indeed, “The Ecstasy of Saint Teresa” and “Blessed Ludovica Albertoni” are the two masterpieces that did not allow Bernini to fade into obscurity in the declining years, as happened with many great ones.
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A wild and miraculous cocktail it was, mix of carnal passion and spiritual desire. Look at these young nuns, not at all burdened with asceticism, and you will understand why Bernini was kindly treated, despite his criminal episode and epic failures.

Cold Stone, Hot Sex: Gian Lorenzo Bernini

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Gian Lorenzo Bernini,  also Gianlorenzo or Giovanni Lorenzo (7 December 1598 – 28 November 1680), an Italian sculptor and architect, loved sex, was very fond of sex, and was one of greatest admirers of carnal pleasures.
At the age of 16 he created a masterpiece that emanates passion — The Rape of Proserpina (1621-22). It’s hard to believe that the hot, full-bodied passion marble is the work of a sixteen-year-old boy!Скульптура_Джан-Лоренцо-Бернини_Похищение-Прозерпины-1621-22_02.jpgNo, not a boy, but a man. A man who knew about the power of passion and how impossible it is to contain. Proserpine seems to fly upwards, trying to escape from the strong embrace of Pluto, and the fingers of God of Underworld cling to her young flesh. No one could make stone convey soft skin, curling hair, or crinkling fabrics the way Bernini could.  Related image

Bernini was 26 when he created Apollo and Daphne.  The technique of the caught moment reaches perfection.Apollo & Daphne September 2a.jpg
Apollo is consumed by desire, but Daphne appealed to the gods, “Destroy the beauty that has injured me, or change the body that destroys my life.”  Gods obliged, and the maiden was turned into a tree. Скульптура_Джан-Лоренцо-Бернини_Аполлон-и-Дафна-1622–25_02.jpg

A real passion born of love is always a movement, it is a whirlwind that captures the body. Passion is like a tornado, and its frenzied movement is felt in Bernini’s masterpiece. The chase is over, the movement fades. Daphne’s feet grow into the ground, hands turn into twigs, and Apollo slows his run at a loss, feeling in his left hand not the desired flesh, but a rough tree bark.

(to be continued…)

Meet The Artist: Gregory Scott

Gregory Scott, designer, artist, photographer.

Disconnect

Most of my life I worked as a graphic designer and creative director. I owned a design firm in Chicago and it was a great ride. But eventually I began to want something different. I began to play around with art in my free time, painting and shooting photographs.

Bound

[…] The idea I had tested was to take some paintings I made during a figure painting class and fill in missing parts of the painted figure with myself. I thought it was fun and different, but didn’t really have any plans for what to do next, if anything at all.

Thank You Jeff Koons and Art Rogers

Framed

Homage

Storybook

 

“all by himself with leaves, trees, mud and rabbits”

Christ in the Wilderness. Driven by the Spirit. And immediately the Spirit driveth him into the wilderness.” Mark 1:12

Stanley Spencer (1891 – 1959), a great English artist, joined in his work expressionism and primitivism, mysticism and grotesque. The cycle of his paintings “Christ in the Wilderness” (1939-54) literally overturns traditional notion about Christ and his relationship with the Earth.
IN middle age, eccentric British painter Stanley Spencer changed his obsession from religion to sex — with disastrous consequences. He divorced his homely first wife Hilda Carline and shacked up (or tried to) with glamorous lesbian Patricia Preece, who turned out to be mainly interested in his money. The potboilers he painted in the 1930s were done to keep Preece in furs and jewels; and he made the mistake of signing over his house to her. Not long after their wedding, Preece let out the house, making Spencer homeless.The director of the Tate Gallery found ­Spencer lodgings near Swiss Cottage Tube station in north London. It was in this bedsit that the artist embarked on a series of paintings called Christ in the Wilderness, which included this panel, Consider the Lilies.

“Consider the lilies how they grow,” runs the line in the Gospels to which the title refers. “They toil not, they spin not, and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not ­arrayed like one of these.” Like most of Spencer’s works, however, the biblical scene has been transposed to the Berkshire village of Cookham where he grew up, and which he considered a sort of paradise on earth — these are not lilies but daisies and wild grass flowers of the sort that grew on Cookham common in his youth. (from Stanley Spencer confronts the self, alone in Christ in the Wilderness.)

Many dismissed the artist as an eccentric crank. He identified himself with religious figures, dwelling in contemporary village. Still, it’s exactly this very eccentricity that Spencer’s works so powerful, art lovers and art critics alike agree.Christ In The Wilderness: the hen. This painting illustrates Matthew 23:37 ‘…how often would I have gathered my children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings…’ 

Where else in the Bible does man appear in such union with the beasts, with no fear and alienation? Obviously, in Eden, where Adam resided before the fall. Christ, who came to save mankind from the curse of original sin, is the new Adam, as described in the Epistles of the Apostle Paul. Therefore, the desert where Spencer’s Jesus find himself, is not only the place of fasting and prayer, but also the image of the restored paradise, where man is reunited with God and the universe created by him. The desert is the tiny remnant of Eden, which once extended to the whole Earth, and at the same time the foretaste of a new Earth, where humanity will enter through the saving sacrifice of Christ.

Therefore, Jesus peacefully dwells among animals, birds, plants and with childish curiosity he peers at them, for this firstborn Son of God has found his human nature, similarity with earthly being. As a creature “from another planet”, Jesus gets used to this world, delicately delves into it, amused and delighted. (My free interpretation of the excerpt from the Russian article by M. Epstein, an Anglo-American and Russian literary theorist and critical thinker, S. C. Dobbs Professor of Cultural Theory and Russian Literature at Emory University.) 

Christ in the Wilderness. The Scorpion. “Behold, I give unto you the power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.” Luke 10:19.

There were meant to be 40 panels in the series, one for each day Christ spent in the wilderness. They should have covered the vault of the ceiling of a church, so that the Jesus’ whitish robes would take on the appearance of clouds in a mackerel sky.

Spencer finished only eight panels of the series. Historian Simon Schama described them as “the least elaborate and most affecting things he had ever done”. In 1983, all eight (plus one half-finished canvas) were bought by the Art Gallery of Western Australia for $600,000, the museum’s entire annual budget. It was a wise decision.  Christ in the Wilderness paintings are popular with gallery visitors and much in demand for loans.

Hyperrealistic Picasso

Eugenio Merino, a Spanish sculptor from Picasso's birthplace of Malaga, has created the life-like statue of the artist for a new exhibition highlighting the problems of tourism for locals. Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 he died in France in 1973 having helped create one of the 20th century's most important artistic movements in CubismEugenio Merino, a Spanish sculptor from Picasso’s birthplace of Malaga, has created the life-like statue of Pablo Picasso for a new exhibition highlighting the problems of tourism for locals. Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 he died in France in 1973 having helped create one of the 20th century’s most important artistic movements in Cubism.The work is displayed inside a gift shop and viewers are allowed to take selfies with it, which Merino says will demonstrate how a complex artist and his work has been reduced to souvenir status. Picasso initially started out painting relatively life- like portraits influenced by impressionism, but soon incorporated surreal elements and motifs from African art, creating CubismThe work is displayed inside a gift shop and viewers are allowed to take selfies with it, which Merino says will demonstrate how a complex artist and his work has been reduced to souvenir status. Picasso initially started out painting relatively life- like portraits influenced by impressionism, but soon incorporated surreal elements and motifs from African art, creating Cubism.Merino is allowing tourists to take pictures with the statue, including with selfie sticks which have been banned from most museums, in a move which he hopes will help to prove his point. During his early years in Paris, Picasso was so poor that much of his early work was burned into order to heat his apartment. Today he holds the record for most expensive artwork ever sold, at $117millionThe work is constructed from fiberglass, resin and plastic and has been coated with silicone and embedded with real human hair. Merino matched the model to the artist’s real height, 5’3″ and based it on photographs of him. The artist was well-known in his later years for wearing a striped top, cloth trousers and rope-soled shoes, which he is dressed in for the show.

Merino is allowing tourists to take pictures with the statue, including with selfie sticks which have been banned from most museums, in a move which he hopes will help to prove his point. During his early years in Paris, Picasso was so poor that much of his early work was burned into order to heat his apartment. Today he holds the record for most expensive artwork ever sold, at $117million.Merino said tourism is often harmful to local communities, pushing people out of their homes as prices rise and drawing in huge crowds of people who put a strain on resources. While Picasso often takes all of the credit for having developed Cubism, in fact he created the artistic movement alongside collaborator Georges BraqueMerino said tourism is often harmful to local communities, pushing people out of their homes as prices rise and drawing in huge crowds of people who put a strain on resources. While Picasso often takes all of the credit for having developed Cubism, in fact he created the artistic movement alongside collaborator Georges Braque.Merino (pictured rear) is known for creating sculptures of dead people from history. He has previously made a mode of dictator Franco inside a Coca-Cola fridge, and of Osama bin Laden at a rave. Picasso set the mold for modern artists, and is often cited as the first painter to have achieved real fame while still aliveMerino (pictured rear) is known for creating sculptures of dead people from history. He has previously made a mode of dictator Franco inside a Coca-Cola fridge, and of Osama bin Laden at a rave. Picasso set the mold for modern artists, and is often cited as the first painter to have achieved real fame while still alive.

The “real” Pablo Picasso:Picasso was born in Malaga but left for France as a young boy and never returned. He died in France in 1973. As a nod to this, Merino has written the plaque for his sculpture in French, which reads: 'Here lies our beloved Pablo Picasso, 1881-1973, we miss you.' Picasso did return to Spain several times in his life and drew on it for inspiration with his painting

The related Daily Mail article is here: That’s a good impression(ism): Hyperrealistic sculpture of Picasso complete with HUMAN HAIR goes on display in his birthplace of Malaga.

Giorgio de Chirico

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The founder of the Metaphysical art movement, Giorgio de Chirico (1888-1978) was an Italian (Born in Volos,Greece)surrealist painter, whose work implied a metaphysical questioning of reality. He studied in Athens and Florence, then moved to Germany to continue his studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. There he was influenced by the writings of Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer.https://i2.wp.com/os.colta.ru/m/photo/2009/02/11/giorgio_de_chirico-500.jpgOn his way to Paris, De Chirico traveled back to Florence and later to Turin, where he was moved by the metaphysical beauty of the surroundings. Why suddenly de Chirico?

https://i0.wp.com/smallbay.ru/images/chirico1.jpgPaintings of all major periods of de Chirico’s creative life will be exhibited: both metaphysical and post-metaphysical painting, as well as early canvases. Russian art lovers, Muscovites particularly, suddenly became newly excited about de Chirico, and art bloggers reacted accordingly.

https://i1.wp.com/os.colta.ru/m/photo/2008/11/19/1arrr_big_1.jpgIn the opinion of one blogger, the artist anticipated the further development of historical events in his paintings, as often the case with true visionaries. Her favorites are de Chirico’s landscapes, and her views, however controversial, seemed to me interesting enough to share, loosely translated from Russian.

His [De Chirico’s] landscape is the Imperial Rome with its greatness, power, brutality and… boredom — an ideal depiction of totalitarianism.
After all, she notes, up to the middle of the 20th century, Italy dreamt about the revival of Roman imperial greatness. Nazi dictator Mussolini was the product of this dream. However, nothing of consequence happened:  Italians got a few hefty slaps in the face and, for a time being, forgot their ambitious plans of revival of the Roman Empire.
https://i2.wp.com/tannarh.narod.ru/pics/kir/kir_24.jpgToday’s typical Italian is an elderly person who enjoys comfort, preserves his health and tranquillity. He isn’t in a hurry to exchange his convenience and the opportunity to live   past 80 on such illusory benefit as greatness of his country.

Giorgio de Chirico

Giorgio de Chirico. Self-portrait.

Today’s Russian abandoned his dreams of Cosmos and communism. He wants to become what the Italian has become already.  His prevalent idea of spending the rest  of his life is simple and unburdened by existential questions. It all boils down to growing old,  slowly — oh, so slowly — enjoying his own garden somewhere in the warm climes.  Not everybody can afford such luxury these days, however.  Who will provide such luxury for him? This is yet another existential question, to which there is no answer in de Chirico’s ladscapes.