Venus On Diet

What if

Sandro Boticelli. The Birth of Venus. 1486

Throughout history, the canons of female beauty have been constantly changing. Nowadays, the ideal bodies are these of slender models 90-60-90. The artists of the past centuries, from Rubens to Gauguin, found beauty in the bodies of women who did not fit into any definite framework, let alone the standards of today’s fashion magazines.  But what if these masterpieces were painted using contemporary models? Lauren Wade, using simple Photoshop tricks, puts painted ladies on a strict diet…

What if 2

Titian. Danae. 1544

What if 3

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. Grande Odalisque. 1814
 

What if 4

The Toilette, 1886 by Edgar Degas.

What if 5

Raphael. The Three Graces. 1504–1505

What if 6

La maja desnuda, Francisco Goya, c. 1797–1800

what if 7

 Amedeo Modigliani. Nude Sitting on a Divan (The Beautiful Roman Woman). 1917

 

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Ivan the Terrible Looks Terrible Right Now

Ivan the Terrible

Iliya Repin. Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16, 1581. (1885)

The press service of the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow, Russia, reported on Saturday, May 26, of the vandal attack on Friday evening that damaged the painting of Ilya Repin (1844 – 1930) “Ivan the Terrible and his son Ivan on November 16, 1581”. 

The famous painting was completed by Russian artist and naturalist Ilya Yefimovich Repin in 1885

Ilya Repin

 

“As a result of the blows, the thick glass that protected the work from fluctuations in the temperature-humidity regime was broken,”  the gallery’s officials said in a statement.

“The painting is badly damaged, the canvas is ripped in three places in the central part…. The falling glass also damaged the frame. […] Luckily, the most valuable images, those of the faces and hands of the tsar and prince were not damaged”.

Ivan Fragment37-year-old man from the town of Voronezh was arrested by police shortly after the incident. The suspect declared that he had acted the way he did because of the falsehood of the depiction of historical facts on the canvas — his words in my translation.

Russia Painting Vandalized

Tretyakov Gallery

By preliminary estimation, the restoration of the painting might take a few years.

 

In 1885, upon its completion, the painting made a furor both in St. Petersburg and in Moscow.  Everyone whose opinion counted, admitted to having an utterly depressing impression both during and after observing the painting. The ladies fainted and had hysterics. Children cried inconsolably.  Repin’s masterpiece was deemed harmful and by the order of the sovereign was banned from being exhibited.

Pavel Tretyakov, businessman, patron of art, collector and philanthropist (who gave his name to the Tretyakov Gallery) acquired the painting. It took awhile but the wrath was changed to mercy and  the permission to exhibit the canvas in the gallery was granted.

The recent assassination of the famous painting was not the first one.  On January 16, 1913,  “Ivan the Terrible and his son Ivan on November 16, 1581”, a rather well known icon painter, crying out “Enough blood!” lunged on the painting with a knife and in three strokes pierced the faces of Ivan and his son. The madman was restrained and confined to the mental institution. After learning about the incident, the curator of the Tretyakov Gallery, the kindest and beloved by all  Yegor Khruslov, committed suicide by trowing himself under the speeding train.Repin Damage to IvanThis is a newspaper article where the incident was first reported. Titled Damage to the painting by I. Repin carries the photographs of the damaged part of the painting, of the artist and the small inset is the photo of Abram Balashov, the vandal.

Interesting that the public opinion of the time was firmly on the side of the madman! Crazy Balashov was declared a victim of Repin’s “bloody, disturbing, violent” masterpiece.  Such is the power of art.

Mysteriously and, well, terribly, Ivan the Terrible affected the fate of Repin’s models who selflessly set for his Ivan the Terrible.  Repin was very particular and obsessively picky in choosing his models. Miasoedov and BlambergArtist Grigory Myasoyedov and composer Pavel Blaramberg were asked to pose as Ivan the Terrible.  Grigory Myasoedov  once in anger nearly killed his little son, also named Ivan.
GarshinOne of models for the head of the Prince was writer Vsevolod Garshin with his permanently teary eyes. A fragile and vulnerable person, the author of many wonderful fairy tales, he fell into a severe depression and during one of the anxiety attacks jumped from the fourth floor into the stairwell. He died in agony after five days, only 33 years old. Repin said about his choice of Garshin as his model, “I was struck by an utter doom written on Garshin’s face: he had the face of a man fated to perish before his time, which was excatly what I need for my prince.

 

Soon thereafter, the terrible ailment struck the artist himself. Incongruously, his right arm withered away. Until the end of his life Repin had to paint and write with his left hand. The artist’s contemporaries recall that Repin could not even cross himself properly.

And, in conclusion, while hoping sincerely that Ivan the Terrible will be restored to its bloody, violent, mystical glory, here is the poster where Repin’s Ivan the Terrible behaves terribly toward the Russian Venus by Boris Kustodiyev. 

русская венера и иван с веником.jpg

Digital Grotesque II

Digital Grotesque II . Printing Architecture – Full Version from Digital Grotesque on Vimeo.

Digital Grotesque consists of two full-scale 3D printed grottos. Grotto II, featured in this post, is commissioned by Centre Pompidou, and premiered at the Imprimer le monde exhibition in March 2017. Grotto I is a commission by FRAC Centre, Orléans, for its permanent collection.column-slices-1The grotto is entirely designed by algorithms, and optimized to present highly differentiated geometries that forge a rich and stimulating spatial experience for the observer. A subdivision algorithm exploits the 3D printer’s full potential by creating porous, multi-layered structures with spatial depth.astana-columns-2A single volume spawns millions of branches, growing and folding into a complex topological structure. Hundreds of square meters of surface are compressed into a 3.5 meter high block that forms an organic landscape between the man-made and the natural.astana-columns-4Standing in front of the grotto, one is struck by a hitherto unseen richness of detail that is at times overwhelming. Digital Grotesque is a testament to and celebration of a new kind of architecture that leaves behind traditional paradigms of rationalization and standardization and instead emphasizes the viewer’s perception, evoking marvel, curiosity and bewilderment.imprimer-le-monde-xl5

Link to the Digital Grotesque home page

Ken and Canaletto

Ken Small, 84, who lives near Darlington in County Durham, worked as a mechanic until he retired aged 65, at which point he realized his true calling was painting.Ken Small.jpg
Here is Ken Small proudly posing next to his own life-size version of ‘Venice’ by 18th Century Italian artist Giovanni Antonio Canal (1697 – 1768), better known as Canaletto.

Ken Small Canaletto

Ken or Canaletto?

Couldn’t resist the article about talented Ken.

Salvador Dalí: 2 works up for auction

Cropped image of Maison Pour Érotomane, one of the paintings by Salvador Dalí.

 Cropped image of Maison Pour Érotomane, one of the paintings by Salvador Dalí. Photograph: © Salvador Dali. Fundacio Gala-Salvador Dali, DACS 2011

The Guardian reports that 2 important paintings by Spanish surrealist  Salvador Dalí , sold to Argentinian countess in 1930s, is up for auction. Countess de Cuevas de Vera, nicknamed Tota, who divided her time between Buenos Aires and France and became friends with many artists and cultural figures active in 1920s and 30s Paris, including Luis Buñuel, with whom she had an affair, as well as Dalí, Picasso, and Jean Cocteau (with whom she might or might not had affairs).

Both works are highly charged and packed with symbolism. The earliest, entitled Gradiva (1931), depicts a mythological figure and character from a 1903 novel by Wilhelm Jensen, in which a young archaeologist becomes obsessed by a female figure shown in a Roman bas-relief. It was a story used by Sigmund Freud as a study of the idealization of beauty and notions of love. Gradiva was also the nickname Dalí gave to his wife, Gala.

Gradiva, which Dalí painted in 1931.

Gradiva, which Dalí painted in 1931. Photograph: © Salvador Dali. Fundacio Gala-Salvador Dali, DACS 2011

The other work is entitled Maison Pour Érotomane (1932), (House For Erotomaniac). By all appeance, it is a strange, hallucinatory, work which shows a cello, horse and car emerging from a rock. In the foreground is the artist himself and his wife Gala.

Bompard said the period when the two works were painted was a time when “Dalí became himself”.

Both of the paintings were acquired by the countess and passed through her family. Gradiva has been lent only once, to an exhibition in Lausanne, Switzerland, in the 1980s; Maison Pour Érotomane has not been seen publicly since the 1930s. Each artwork has an estimated value of between £1.2m and £1.8m and will appear at auction at Sotheby’s, London, on 28 February.

“These are the kind of painting that I do my job for,” said Thomas Bompard, head of the impressionist and modern art evening sale. “They are a rediscovery. The quality is A plus plus plus … when you first see them and have to give a price you feel absolutely privileged to be the one to bring these gems to the market for the first time.”

Well then, someone might get lucky and purchase one or both of these artworks…

Meet The Artist: Ivan Marchuk

7marchukHe is compared to Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Pavel Filonov, called “maestro of the highest prestige”, Rembrandt of our days. Not always even fully comprehending his works, people are drawn to them. Who is the genius of the brush?Фото Артема Слипачука 14.01.16 Ретроспективная выставка украинского художника Ивана Марчука "Генотип вольности"Ivan Marchuk  is the only Ukrainian artist recognized by International Academy of Modern Art in Rome as the member of the “Golden Guild”1119811_418551861588210_1741091697_oIvan Marchuk was born in 1936, a family of a weaver, in a Western Ukrainian village. He studied applied art in Lviv till 1965.
11227590_738911496218910_4491635807679922221_oThe artist works tirelessly to create his own pictorial style. He finds inspiration in the most ordinary things.11722633_737923666317693_6483948075264244944_oIn the late 1980s he emigrated to Australia, then traveled to Canada and the USA. But, he was always drawn back to his native land.

“I have to see beauty everywhere, and I want to recreate it. Nowhere in the world is there such a beautiful land as here.” 
892609_418537621589634_278641119_o“Give me a thousand more years and I’ll paint heaven.”
1119835_418537648256298_1861480121_oHe has created his own art technique, which he calls “Pliontanism”  (from the Ukrainian “pliontaty” – to weave, knit). Instead of painting with the usual strokes, he traces and weaves amazing lace networks on his canvas.“There were times when people stood in front of a painting for half an hour. It’s abstract, but it’s done with the hands of a skilled jeweler. We sense a 3D effect. says Maksym Voloshyn.After years of intensive work, Ivan Marchuk admits that art is both a revelation and a lot of hard work. He dreams of resting and relaxing, but returns to his studio every morning.Иван Марчук“If you look at a painting from a distance, you’ll see an ordinary landscape, but when you come a little closer, you notice that unusual threads are woven throughout the painting.” says  Maksym Voloshyn, director of Mystetska Zbirka Art Gallery.In October 2007, Marchuk was included in Britain’s list of  top living geniuses, drawn up by the Daily Telegraph. This curious list, however, deserves its own post…

Michelangelo of Microsoft Excel

www.spoon-tamago.comFor over 15 years, Japanese artist Tatsuo Horiuchi has rendered the subtle details of mountains, cherry blossoms, and dense forests with the most unlikely tool: Microsoft Excel. The 77-year-old illustrator shunned the idea of paying for expensive painting supplies or even a basic drawing program for his computer, saying that he prefers Excel even over Microsoft Paint because it has “more functions and is easier to use.” www.spoon-tamago.com

www.spoon-tamago.comUsing simple vector drawing tools developed primarily for graphs and simple shapes, Horiuchi instead draws panoramic scenes of life in rural Japan.

 

Chained To History

 

Artist imprisoned by ‘weight of history’ freed after 3 weeks (PHOTOS, VIDEOS)A Belgian performance artist, Mikes Poppe, chained to a block of marble for 20 days, became the victim of his own artistic metaphor when he had to be cut loose from the installation.

The eccentric artist created the project to demonstrate that it’s not possible to escape the burden of history.  Indeed, it isn’t. Mikes was unable to chisel himself free of the stone structure as originally intended.

“My performance has different layers of meaning,” he told VRT NWS beforehand. “For me marble is the sculpture, I chain myself to a piece of history, I take art history with me, and at the same time I build on it and let it go again.”

Poppe attached himself to a block of Carrara marble in the courthouse of Ostend, Belgium on November 10. He remained chained to the block 24 hours a day with no phone or computer for outside communication.

Besides working to break himself free, Poppe spent the remainder of his time eating, sleeping and drawing.

Poppe describes himself as an artist-cum-terrorist. He lasted 438 hours attached to the marble block by a 10 feet (about 3 meters) chain. He tried his darnedest to chisel away the stone, to no avail.

Entitled De Profundis, Poppe’s performance was part of a larger exhibition curated by Joanna De Vos. “This is not a failure, but a positive story,” De Vos said. Well, it depends on a point of view, I’d say.

The work, according to the Poppe’s intent, aims to show the life of an artist in a state of terminal loneliness and extreme concentration. Five cameras recorded the artist throughout the entire performance and broadcast online.

 

 

Dada, Surréalisme et au-delà

On 21 October in Paris, Sotheby’s offered for sale the collection of Dr. Arthur Brandt, whose passion and appreciation for Dada and Surrealism is reflected in this auction. Highlights include numerous works by Marcel Duchamp and Kurt Schwitters as well as a major work by Francis Picabia and others by Yves Tanguy, Man Ray, and Max Ernst.

The auction has now ended, with a grand total of €21.5 million.

All right then. Let’s take a look at Dada, Surréalisme et au-delà, particularly at the two out of several works of  Marcel Duchamp. Above is his “L.H.O.O.R”. Quoting Wikipedia:

In 1919, Duchamp made a parody of the Mona Lisa by adorning a cheap reproduction of the painting with a mustache and goatee. To this he added the inscription L.H.O.O.Q., a phonetic game which, when read out loud in French quickly sounds like “Elle a chaud au cul”. This can be translated as “She has a hot ass”, implying that the woman in the painting is in a state of sexual excitement and availability. It may also have been intended as a Freudian joke, referring to Leonardo da Vinci‘s alleged homosexuality. Duchamp gave a “loose” translation of L.H.O.O.Q. as “there is fire down below” in a late interview with Arturo Schwarz. According to Rhonda Roland Shearer, the apparent Mona Lisa reproduction is in fact a copy modeled partly on Duchamp’s own face.[33] Research published by Shearer also speculates that Duchamp himself may have created some of the objects which he claimed to be “found objects”.

On October 21, L.H.O.O.Q fetched a whooping 631,500 euros. Gasp.

Dada artists are known for their use of ready-made objects — everyday objects that could be bought and presented as art with little manipulation by the artist. The use of the ready-made forced questions about artistic creativity and the very definition of art and its purpose in society.

Indeed, L.H.O.O.Q manifests remarkably little manipulation by the artist upon the ready-made object — a cheap print of La Joconde! Just harping.

Boîte-en-valise, yet another Duchamp, is a portable museum containing 68 of his most famous works, either reproduced or miniaturised, has been sold  for €319,500.

Dada was the first conceptual art movement where the focus of the artists was not on crafting aesthetically pleasing objects but on making works that often upended bourgeois sensibilities and that generated difficult questions about society, the role of the artist, and the purpose of art.

And what a remarkably cheap and time-and-effort-consuming method to achieve such a noble goal! Makes me, a skeptic lacking of appreciation for Dadaism, wonder if Dadaists themselves defined their intentions while “crafting their art”.  Numerous art critics say yes and more:

So intent were members of Dada on opposing all norms of bourgeois culture that the group was barely in favor of itself: “Dada is anti-Dada,” they often cried.

The video clip below features the entire Collection Arthur Brandt : Dada, Surréalisme et au-delà, courtesy of Sotheby’s site:

//players.brightcove.net/104524641001/default_default/index.html?videoId=5604643841001

Meet The Sculptor: Luo Li Rong

Luo Li Rong is a Chinese artist born in 1980 who settled in Belgium. She studied at the Academy of Fine Arts of Beijing. Once she graduated, she joined the studio of Zon Jiabao, which allowed her to refine her figurative style. Luo Li Rong produces realistic sculptures that convey the beauty and grace of the human body. Her life-size creations feature women in motion. They strike elegant poses that elongate their bodies with a seemingly windswept appearance; their hair and clothing look as though they’re being moved by a gentle breeze. This creates a compelling dichotomy; while there is an impressive dedication to realism.
Rong is careful to detail each delicate fold of the skin. There’s also a fantastical element to her work, as her characters reside on clouds and hold raindrops in their hands.Работа художницы и скульптора Луо Ли РонгРабота художницы и скульптора Луо Ли Ронг

The artist, by her own admission, is greatly inspired by Renaissance and Baroque sculpting techniques. The veiled marble sculptures of a renown Italian, Giovanni Strazza (1818-1875), might as well be among the works that influenced this talented young sculptor.

Image result
This statue was executed in flawless Carrera marble by the renowned Italian sculptor Giovanni Strazza (1818-1875) in Rome.